1pronounsthat, That Or That Is?sindarin Lessons

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The phrase **hannon le comes from the Lord of the Rings film trilogy. David Salo, the linguist who prepared the Quenya and Sindarin material for these films, reconstructed the verb **hanna- 'to thank' likely around the year 2000. But the story of this reconstruction goes back to 1980, to the publication of the Unfinished Tales. In this book, we see the word Eruhantalë with its meaning 'Thanksgiving to Eru', and it would be safe to assume that hantalë means 'thanksgiving' by itself. It is also rather clear that the final element of this word is the abstract noun suffix, -lë, which Quenya is known to employ and form nouns from verbs. Thus, we reach the Quenya verb *hanta-, meaning 'to give thanks'.

  1. 1pronounsthat That Or That Is Sindarin Lessons In The Bible
  2. 1pronounsthat That Or That Is Sindarin Lessons Learned
  3. 1pronounsthat That Or That Is Sindarin Lessons Grammar
  4. 1pronounsthat That Or That Is Sindarin Lessons Written

I am seeking a good and/or universally approved Sindarin dictionary. I have Ruth Noble's Languages of Tolkien's Middle-earth which helps with syntax and grammar tremendously. But the good Professor only has about 200 Sindarin words in place. Translate your sentences and websites from Sindarin into English, Spanish, French, German, Portuguese, Russian, Chinese, Japanese, Arabic, Hindi and world 118 languages. We also provide free Sindarin dictionaries, free Sindarin spelling checker and free Sindarin typing keyboard. Added interactive quizzes to Lesson 16 and Lesson 17. 12/08/19 Lessons 14 and 15 now have interactive quizzes. 15/04/19 PDF full course download has been updated to version 8.1 23/03/19 Updated Lesson 6 18/03/19 Added an interactive quiz to Lesson 13 18/01/19 Added a Gondorian Sindarin vocabulary PDF to Lesson. Start studying Terms of endearment in Sindarin. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

Since we have the Quenya verb, we can now try and reconstruct it for Sindarin. This means that we will use the phonetic development rules that concern Sindarin (rather than Quenya) as we derive it from Primitive Quenderin. But in the early 2000s, we had no documents in which a PQ root for this verb was shared. Then we need to guess what its root may be, and back then the only attested root which supports it phonetically was √KᴴAN, despite its unfitting meaning 'to understand'. Having almost no other option at the time, Salo might have used this root and assumed that it might have had a semantic shift during its journey to Sindarin (and also to Quenya *hanta- 'to give thanks'). Now, without going into great detail on the development stages: Ancient kʰ- is found as h- in both Quenya and Sindarin: √KᴴER > Q. heru ⪤ S. hîr. Meanwhile -nt- in Quenya words is often found as -nn- in Sindarin: Q. panta- ⪤ S. panna-. In conclusion, given the lack of attested material at the time, reconstructing Quenya *hanta- as Neo-Sindarin **hanna- was an arguably safe approach. However, in 2002, the 43rd issue of Vinyar Tengwar shared the root √HAN 'add to, increase, enhance, honour (espec. by gift)' which fits much better with Q. *hanta- in terms of its meaning. And this is where the problems arise, because in 1994 we were told:

PQh- only survived in the dialects of Aman. It disappeared without trace in Sindarin. [HoME-XI/365]

If the root for this verb is √HAN, and if ancient h- disappeared in Sindarin, then our verb must be *anna- instead. This is a problem, because we already have anna- attested as 'to give, add to'. But then comes the 22nd issue of Parma Eldalamberon to share some of the latest linguistic writings by Tolkien, offering the Telerin verb han- 'to give' as a derivation from √HAN (which likely means that han- and hanta- share the same root, as even S. anna- shows the 'to add to' sense of this root). More importantly, the gerund form of the 'to give' verb of Sindarin was shared as aned (which would have been *annad in earlier works), and this seems to suggest that Tolkien changed anna- to be an- in his later works, derived from the same root as its Telerin cognate. And so we can argue that *anna- is free to use as 'to give thanks', especially since we see both han- and *hanta- in the languages of the Blessed Realm (thus supporting that Sindarin could also use 'an- & anna-' as separate verbs from the same root).

Now, we may attempt to use *anna- 'to give thanks' in a phrase to say 'thank you'. For this, we would need 'you' in dative form, as analogues like ón annin show us. And while Tolkien did use le (which is the formal/polite second person pronoun) as dative, its form actually appears to be nominative, arguably used as an 'absolute form' (which could function as both accusative and dative) as his gloss '[to] you' may suggest with the brackets. On the other hand, the actual dative form of le is somewhat unclear, but the current approach in Tolkienian Linguistics communities is to use *allen 'to you', based on attested examples like annin 'to me' and ammen 'to us'. Thus, we get:

Annon allen!
I give thanks to you!

Please keep in mind that this is not meant to be an 'absolutely correct' form of giving thanks in Sindarin, although it is an arguably better alternative to **hannon le. Even its creator Salo would not disagree with the issues of the old phrase, due to more recent evidence to the contrary. And the same could happen with this new alternative, along with all other works which concern Neo-Quenya and Neo-Sindarin. Everything is and will remain subject to change until their direct attestation in the posthumously published works of Tolkien, which are currently being edited by the Elvish Linguistic Fellowship for publication in linguistic journals like Vinyar Tengwar and Parma Eldalamberon.

The voice actors were Fiona Jallings (female voice that struggles with R-rolling) and Adam Elliott (male voice brought in to roll R’s).

General Dialect

Sindarin has three different writing systems, so the sounds are written with all three.

  1. Cirth: which was used by the Sindarin elves, including those in Doriath and later the Woodelves. This is the writing system that Legolas and Thranduil would be familiar with.
  2. Tengwar, the Mode of Beleriand: which was used by the Noldorin Exiles in Beleriand and later on Eregion. This is the writing system that Elrond and his family would be familiar with.
  3. Tengwar, the Classical Mode: which was used by the Númenóreans and later the Gondorians. This is the writing system that Boromir and Faramir would have been familiar with.

Vowels

cIv]=]F`C=~C (A/Á/Â) Pronounce them /ɑ/, like the A is in the word “father”.

Recording features the words: Anc, Balch, Cân, Dâth, Fast, Glass, Hâdh, Iâ

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/A.wav

bIñl=lF`V=~V (E/É/Ê) Pronounce them /ɛ/, like the E of “better”.

Recording features the words: Êg, Le, Melch, Nêl, Pend, Rest, Sen, Têw

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/E.wav

lI;`=`V`B=~B (I/Í/Î) Pronounce them /i/, as in the word “machine”. The Sindarin I also acts like the consonant Y before vowels.

Recording features the words: Inc, Brith, Cîl, Dîr, Find, Glî, Hîth, Lhîw

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/I.wav

ðIòy=yF`N=~N (O/Ó/Ô) Pronounce them /ɔ/ as in the word “thought.”

Recording features the words: Ôl, Lô, Môr, Norn, Post, Ross, Sôg, Thôn

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/O.wav

SIk.=.F`M=~M (U/Ú/Û) Pronounce them /u/ as in “brute”, in the front of your mouth. Make your lips in the shape of a kiss.

Recording features the words: Û, Tûr, Brûn, Cund, Drû, Gurth, Hûb, Iûl

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/U.wav

øIùIýi=iF`×=~× (Y/Ý/Y) Pronounce them /y/ like the French U, as in “lune”. To make this sound, make your mouth in the shape of the Sindarin (I). Then, shape your lips the same way you shape “U” in Sindarin. Or, take the easy road out and use the Gondorian pronunciation, and say it “i” like the Sindarin “I” above.

Recording features the words: Ylf, Cyll, Ym, Gyrth, Lyg, Myl, Yr, Ryn

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Y.wav

*Accents on vowels denote extra length on the vowels. Hold the vowels longer. In music this is shown with a tenuto (-) over the note. The circumflex accent (^) is held longer than an acute accent (´). In IPA, the Sindarin circumflex accent would be shown with (ː) and the Sindarin acute accent would be shown with (ˑ). The second one there is not an apostrophe (‘).

Diphthongs

íhD (AI) Pronounce this /ɑj/, as in the word “twine”.

Recording features the words: Aith, Bain, Cai, Fair, Gail, Haim, Iaich, Lain

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/AI.wav

&]llD (AE) Pronounce this /ɑɛ/, almost exactly the same at (AI) above, just glide into an (E), not an (I).

Recording features the words: Aes, Caew, Laeg, Mael, Naeth, Paen, Raew, Saer, Taeg

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/AE.wav

*yD (AU) Pronounce this /ɑu/, as in the word “ouch”.

Recording features the words: Caul, Daug, Faun, Gaur, Haust, Iaun, Naug, Paur, Raun

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/AU.wav

*yD (AW) Pronounce this /ɑw/, as in the word “owl”.

Recording features the words: Raw, Rhaw, Saw, Taw, Baw, Daw, Gaw, Iaw, Maw

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/AW.wav

JhF (EI) Pronounce this /ej/, as in “ray“.

Recording features the words: Eilph, Ceir, Fein, Feir, Gweith, Heir, Meil, Neil

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/EI.wav

õhllH (OE) Pronounce this /ɔɛ/, as in the word “boy“.

Recording features the words: Oeth, Boe, Coen, Doeg, Foen, Hoest, Loeg

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/OE.wav

LhJ (UI) Pronounce this /uj/, as in the word “gooey“.

Recording features the words: Uil, Muin, Nuin, Puig, Ruin, Sui, Tuiw, Brui

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/UI.wav

Consonants

eaz (C), Rsx (G), %88=i (S) These each are pronounced only one way, but since they are all sounds that we have in English, there won’t be recording for these. Pronounce them always /k/, /g/, and /s/, as in the words “cat”, “give”, “sell”.

z`h=l (I) Before a vowel at the beginning of a word, (I) is pronounced /j/ and used as a consonant, as the Y in the word “yellow”. If there is an accent on the (I) you always pronounce it /i/, as you do for the vowel. If there is a consonant before it, (I) before another vowel doesn’t make it a Y consonant, it behaves like the vowel (I).

Recording features the words: Iaew, Iâl, Iaun, Iest, Io, Iôl, Iuith, Iûl

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/I2.wav

3ee (F) Pronounce it like the F in “fun” unless it’s at the end of a word. At the end of word, say it as a /v/ as in the word “slave”. At the end of a word, it’s spelled differently as well: 4rr

1pronounsthat, That Or That Is?sindarin LessonsThat

Recording features the words: Falf, Parf, Lâf, Gorf, Nef

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/F.wav

f99 (-H, At the end of a word) It will be put at the beginning of the following word, but only if that words starts with a vowel. H’s at the ends of words are otherwise silent.

ajj (L) pronounce it as a /l/, as in the word “late”. When it comes between E or I and a consonant, or at the end of a word after E or I, it is pronounced /ʎ/, with the middle or tip of the tongue touching the palate behind the ridge behind the teeth.

Recording features the words: Lest, Pêl, Edhellen, Elbereth, Talan, Mallen, Alphirin

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/L.wav

amm (LH) Pronounce it /l̥/, a voiceless L. That means, you shape your mouth the same way that you would when making the L sound, but only air will come out, and it will sound a little like an H. This sound never appears within a word. If you see LH inside a word rather than as the first two letters in a word, then it is two separate sounds, L and H.

Recording features the words: Lhaew, Lhain, Lhê, Lhind, Lhing, Lhîw, Lhoss

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/LH.wav

@77 (R) Pronounce it as an /r/; roll it as we sometimes do in the word “growl” If you can’t roll an R, like me, make an H sound with your throat closed a little. It should make a rolled A sound. It’ll be a little like gargling water.

Recording features the words: Rem, Grond, Parf, Môr

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/R.wav

@uu (RH) Pronounce it /r̊/, a voiceless R. That means, you shape your mouth the same way that you would when making the rolled R sound, but only air will come out, like a trilled H. This sound never appears within a word. If you see RH inside a word rather than as the first two letters in a word, then it is two separate sounds, R and H.

Recording features the words: Rhîw, Rhass, Rhosc, Rhûn

1pronounsthat That Or That Is Sindarin Lessons In The Bible

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/RH.wav

3ee (PH) Pronounce it always /f/, as in the word “phone”.

tdc (CH) Pronounce it /x/, as in the name “Bach“. Say it in the back of your mouth, it should feel a little as though you are hocking a loogy, or gargling without anything in your mouth.

Recording features the words: Châdh, Bach, Roch, Chaew, Chwest, Melch, Orch

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/CH.wav

033 (TH) Pronounce it /θ/, like the TH in the word “nothing”.

Recording features the words: Thîr, Hîth, Thêl, Carth

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/TH.wav

1pronounsthat That Or That Is Sindarin Lessons Learned

!44 (DH) Pronounce it /ð/, like the TH in the words “the” and “blithe“.

Recording features the words: Adh, Dhaw, Dhant, Edhel, Ídhra, Galadhon

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/DH.wav

5oo (HW) Pronounce it /ʍ/, as in the word “white”. It’s a really airy W. This sound never appears within a word. If you see HW inside a word rather than as the first two letters in a word, then it is two separate sounds, H and W.

Recording features the words: Hwand, Hwest, Hwind, Hwá

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/HW.wav

hgb (NG/Ñ) Pronounce these /ŋ/, as in the word “sing“. N’s before C’s are pronounced the same way.

Recording features the words: Anc, Ñail, Ñaur, Lanc, Ang, Lang, Inc, Ñôl

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/NG.wav

DsPxP (NG/ÑG) Pronounce them /ŋg/. When (NG) is between two vowels, pronounce it with both the N and the G, like in the word “finger”.

Recording features the words: i ñgelydh, Fangorn, añ gail, i ñgoer, añ gas, Tangada

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/NG2.wav

The rest of the letters are pronounced as we pronounce them in English.

Where the stress falls

Stress is when a syllable is said louder and higher pitched than other syllables in a word. Primary stress (the loudest, highest syllable) is notated by having a (ˈ) before the syllable, and secondary stress (not as high and loud as the primary stress, but higher and louder than the rest of the syllables) is marked with a (ˌ) before the syllable.

Syllables are determined by vowel-sounds. There is one vowel or diphthong per a syllable. When looking for where to place stress, look only at the last three syllables.

  • If the word is 1, 2, or 3 syllables long then the first syllable gets the stress.
  • If it is longer than 3 syllables, the 3rd syllable from the end gets the stress.
  • If the 2nd to last syllable in a word has one of these special markers, it gets the stress instead of the 3rd syllable from the end.
    1. Accents (Acute and Circumflex)
    2. Diphthongs (AE, AI, AU, AW, EI, OE, and UI)
    3. Multiple Consonants (This only counts if they come at the end of the syllable. They can be two of the same letter side by side. They could also be several different consonants next to each other. Remember that CH, DH, and TH only count as one consonant.)

Dialects

We’ve covered above the basic sounds of Sindarin, now we’ll learn how the dialects differentiate from eachother in ways that won’t show up in the spellings of the words.

Doriathren Sindarin

With the voice of Roandil (the male voice) and Fiona (the woman who can’t roll R’s to save her life).

This dialect was spoken by the Sindar in Beleriand before Morgoth and the Noldor arrived. Later it was preserved in Doriath, no doubt do to Melian’s Girdle which preserved and protected everything within. This dialect covers a long period of time, and has no influences from Quenya.

In Pre-invasion Sindarin; there are five sounds that we need to pay attention to. M, LTH, MPH, NTH, and NCH/ÑCH. These are pretty self explanatory. You can use the general Sindarin pronunciation section above to figure out the pronunciation of these.

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At the moment Melian’s Girdle went up, Sindarin was in a moment of massive change. The dialects outside of Doriath have these sound turn into V, LL, MM, NN, and NG, respectively.

6 (M → MH) Pronounce this /ṽ/ as a nasalized V. Make a V in your mouth, but push the air through your nose like when you’re making an M. If there is a U before the MH, it also ends up nasalized.

Recording features the words: Lûmh, Samho, Mhen, Mheren, Mhae, Pedimh

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/MH_labiodental_nasal.mp3

a0 (LTH) Pronounced /l̥l̥/ the same as the LH above, but longer, ending the previous syllable and starting the next.

Recording features the words: Malthorn, Oltho, Toltha, Haltha, Doltha

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/LTH.mp3

63 (MPH) Pronounced /m̥;m̥/, a long voiceless M. To make this sound, whisper an M, like when you say “mhm.”

Recording features the words: Limphida, Tampha, Nimphida, Hampha, Blamphen

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/MPH.mp3

,0 (NTH) Pronounced /n̥n̥/, a long, voiceless N. To make this sound, whisper an N.

Recording features the words: Abonthen, Dantha, Cinthog, Antha, Fantha

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/NTH.mp3

ht (NCH) Pronounced /ŋ̊ŋ̊/, a long, voiceless Ñ. To make this sound, whisper an Ñ.

Recording features the words: Danchen, Bancha, Tanchada, Sonchen

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/NCH.mp3

Woodelven Sindarin

This dialect was spoken by the Non-Sindarin Woodelves in Lothlórien and Mirkwood. It’s heavily influenced by their native language, Nandorin, and the dialect of Sindarin that they came in contact with, the Southern dialect of Beleriand. I’ve reflected their pronunciation differences in the names like Tolkien did, but not in the phrases provided on the website.

& (AE) Pronounce this like the Sindarin (E) above. This is why a&Rðac% (Legolas) is pronounced and spelled in the Latin alphabet with an E instead of AE.

Gondorian Sindarin

This dialect was spoken in Gondor as a second language by Gondorian nobility. It’s heavily affected by their native language, Westron, and therefore it lacks certain sounds that their own language does. I’ve reflected their pronunciation differences in the names like Tolkien did, but not in the phrases provided on the website.

`×=~×(Y/Ý/Ŷ) Pronounce them /i/ like the Sindarin “I” above.

c (CH) Pronounce it like an (H) when coming before a vowel, thus the word “Rohan” instead of “Rochan”. Everywhere else, the (CH) becomes (C), thus “Orcrist” instead of “Orchrist”.

Recording features the words: Châdh (Hâdh), Bach (Bac), Roch (Roc), Chaew (Haew), Chwest (Cwest), Melch (Melc), Orch (Orc)

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/CH2.wav

Note: I am using Northwestern American English, which anyone can tell you, is a little different from the rest of the world’s English. I tried to compromise by using IPA, but if some of the English examples still don’t make sense, let me know, and I’ll try to find a better word.

Sources:

1pronounsthat That Or That Is Sindarin Lessons Grammar

The Lord of the Rings (The Return of the King) – Appendix E

The Unfinished Tales – Cirion and Eorl – Note 49

The Silmarillion – Note on Pronunciation

1pronounsthat That Or That Is Sindarin Lessons Written

Parma Eldalamberon #17: Words, Phrases and Passages in The Lord of the Rings – pages 131-134