Hebridean Whale And Dolphin Trust

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The Hebridean Whale and Dolphin Trust is a charity founded in 1994, based in Tobermory, Isle of Mull. Our goal is to increase the knowledge and understanding of Scotland’s whales, dolphins and porpoises (cetaceans) as a basis for the lasting conservation of local species and habitats.

Hebridean Whale and Dolphin Trust 28 Main Street, Tobermory, Isle of Mull, Scotland, PA75 6NU, United Kingdom 20 [email protected] Registered Scottish Charity No: SC022403. Hebridean Whale and Dolphin Trust, Tobermory, Argyll and Bute. Tank 1990 nes rom download. 15,768 likes 73 talking about this 94 were here. The Hebridean Whale and Dolphin Trust is the trusted voice and leading source of.

Hebridean Whale And Dolphin Trust

Acronym: HWDT

Description

The Hebridean Whale and Dolphin Trust is a charity founded in 1994, based in Tobermory, Isle of Mull. Our goal is to increase the knowledge and understanding of Scotland’s whales, dolphins and porpoises (cetaceans) as a basis for the lasting conservation of local species and habitats. Towards this end, we conduct research from our vessel Silurian; host workshops in schools and communities; and engage widely with coastal communities about conservation issues in our area.

Resources

  1. Visual sightings data set 2003-2020
    HWDT assess the relative abundance, densities and distribution of marine mammal species and basking shark on the west of Scotland using an 18 m motor-sailor vessel Silurian that conducts systematic line transect surveys. Effort and sightings data is collected between April and October during daylight hours.

Usage statistics

Metadata last updated on 2019-09-25 08:11:39.0

Abstract

Hebridean Whale Trail

Dolphin

Hebridean Whale And Dolphin Trust Reviews

In 2000, a survey was conducted on whale-watching tourists in west Scotland. Slightly more females went whale-watching than expected and generally whale-watchers were middle-aged, although there was a notable proportion of younger participants. Whale-watchers were more likely to be accompanied by children than general tourists. Whale-watchers were also predominantly middle-class and well-educated. Most (83.8%) were British, a quarter of which were Scottish. Seventy per-cent were repeat visitors to the area. Sixty-two per cent of whale-watchers stated that they were on their rst whale-watching trip, and of those who had been whale-watching before, the majority (43.3%) had done so in the UK (90.4 % in Scotland). Most whale-watchers (81.4%) had previously been aware of the occurrence of cet-aceans in West Scotland and 75.2 % could correctly name at least one local species; the most commonly cited species being the minke whale (31.7%). However, fewer than half of the tourists were aware of whale-watching opportunities in the region and 40 % of whale-watchers had only become aware of whale-watching opportunities when they arrived in the area, demonstrating a need to publicise and promote the availability of whale-watching trips in West Scotland.